July 17, 2015

Moist - Best of Canadian Rock



Moist is a Canadian alternative rock band that originally formed in 1992. It consists of David Usher as lead vocalist, Mark Makoway on lead guitars, Jonathan Gallivan on guitars, Kevin Young on keyboards, Francis Fillion on drums and Louis Lalancette on bass.

The band's original drummer Paul Wilcox left the band just before its hiatus in 2000, and original bassist Jeff Pearce departed shortly after its reestablishment in early 2014.

After releasing an independent demo cassette in 1993, Moist was signed by EMI Music and released three official studio albums throughout the 1990s, becoming a staple of Canadian music culture. Shortly after releasing a compilation album in 2001, the band underwent an unplanned hiatus for over a decade, and then became officially reestablished in June 2013.

 Shortly after reuniting, the band began work on their fourth studio album, entitled Glory Under Dangerous Skies, which was released on October 7, 2014.

On May 15, 2014, the band announced that they had signed a new deal with Universal Music Canada. The band also announced the title of their new single, "Mechanical", which was released to radio on May 23 and to ITunes on May 27.

July 01, 2015

Dear Rouge



Dear Rouge

Drew and Danielle McTaggart were both touring musicians under separate projects. They met while in their early touring days, and began dating, before getting married and starting Dear Rouge. The name of the duo is derived from the name of Danielle's home town, Red Deer, Alberta.

In April 2012, Dear Rouge independently released their debut EP Heads Up! Watch Out!, a four-song EP on their Bandcamp page, and followed up six months later with their second EP Kids Wanna Know.

In November 2012, Dear Rouge won $102,700 as the grand prize winners of the Peak Performance Project put on by the Music BC Industry Organization and CKPK-FM radio station in Vancouver.

In June 2013, Exposure Contest and Dear Rouge partnered up to present a video editing contest in support of their single, "Thinking About You", from their Kids Wanna Know EP The contest drew a wide social media spread, accumulating hundreds of entrants from around the world.


In March 2014, the band's second single "I Heard I Had" charted at #3 in Alternative Rock (Mediabase). #3 in Modern Rock (Mediabase), and at #13 in Canadian Rock (BDS radio).

The band released their third single "Best Look Lately" on April 22nd, 2014. As of September 2014, it has also cracked the Top 20 of the Canadian Alternative Rock and Modern Rock charts.

The band signed to the Canadian branch of Universal Music Group in October 2014, and announced that their debut album Black To Gold will be released through them in early 2015.

The band's fourth single, title track "Black To Gold", was sent to radio on January 13th 2015. Black To Gold (Single) was made available digitally on February 10th along with a pre-order for the album.
On February 2nd the band announced March 30th as the release date for the album and a tour with Arkells. As of May 2015, "Black To Gold" had hit #2 on the Canadian Alt-Rock charts

June 26, 2015

The Tragically Hip



The Tragically Hip, often referred to simply as The Hip, are a Canadian rock band from Kingston, Ontario, consisting of lead singer Gordon Downie, guitarist Paul Langlois, guitarist Rob Baker (known as Bobby Baker until 1994), bassist Gord Sinclair, and drummer Johnny Fay. Since their formation in 1983 they have released 12 studio albums, two live albums, 1 EP, and 54 singles. Nine of their albums have reached No. 1 in Canada.

They have received numerous Canadian Music awards, including 14 Juno Awards.

June 19, 2015

Ivory Hours Canadian Band



Ivory Hours is an alt-pop band from London, Ontario. Formed by songwriter Luke Roes in 2012, the band has been riding an upward spiral over the last year. After enlisting a new rhythm section in fall 2013 they won 98.1 Free FM’s Under The Covers Contest, financing the recording of ‘Mary’ – a colorful, pop-laden EP embracing a new danceable and polished sound for the band. The title track ‘Mary’ entered regular rotation on 98.1, on CBC and charted on campus radio across the country. Upbeat music videos for ‘Mary’ and ‘Hello Honey’ gained traction online, landing features in Noisey, Exclaim, Popdose and the front page of Reddit.

June 13, 2015

Scary Bear Soundtrack

Scary Bear Soundtrack 

Scary Bear Soundtrack is an indie dream pop act, blending layers of shoegaze with synth pop. For the last few years, the band has been based in Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, making Scary Bear Soundtrack one of the northernmost indie bands in the world. Currently, Scary Bear Soundtrack is a long distance project featuring the works of Gloria Guns (Ottawa) and Christine Aye (Cambridge Bay).
Formerly of Hamilton Trading Co. (w/ members of the Diableros and BEAMS), Gloria has been performing for over a decade, while also supporting other acts such as Paris-based Melissa Laveauxgatesgatesgates (w/ former members of Cuff the Duke and the Postage Stamps), and Mike Kuehn (of Sleepytown Sound). Gloria was classically trained on the piano since age five and self-taught on the guitar since age twelve.  Christine grew up in Myanmar, where she performed in a metal band.
On September 8, 2014, the band released a new full length split album “The Longest Night”, written and recorded with Avid Napper. The single “The Longest Night”, written in collaboration with Avid Napper, made it to the top 10 acts across all of Canada in the national round for CBC Music’s Searchlight competition for Canada’s Best New Artist, out of 4500 bands.  In addition, The Longest Night was the highest debut for the week of May 23, 2014, making it to #2 on CBC Radio 3’s R3-30 Countdown for Canada’s top indie songs of the week, where it remained for over a month, and was included in the Top 103 Songs of the Year by CBC Music.  The Longest Night has received national airplay by radio stations across Canada.

Named after the Scary Bear horror films (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqJPlt5wpsU) (also produced by Gloria) and equipped with a healthy love of synths, vintage amps, and chorus guitar pedals, Scary Bear Soundtrack has had the pleasure of performing at many special events including Capital Pride, Ottawa Fashion Week, the Ottawa Rock Lottery and the Women’s World global feminist conference. In 2012, the band’s music gained new international exposure in the Southern African music scene, where Gloria put on a series of special Scary Bear Soundtrack performances in Namibia.
In 2012, Scary Bear Soundtrack released its debut self-titled EP album, featuring the single Beaver Pond Forest. The music video for Beaver Pond Forest, directed by South African-Canadian filmmaker Toni Van Eeden, was featured at the Ottawa International Film Festival in 2014.



May 15, 2015

Death Watch

We moved up here after my mother-in-law had declined to the point she was not safe in her house alone.

The series of events that put us in the position to move to Canada are pointedly bizarre.  Guided?

At any rate we had a year that proved our worth and then she was diagnosed with cancer that was at stage 4.  She refused treatment and there has been a decline ever since.

Now she is in Palliative care Hospice.  The waiting and watching is taking its toll. As you would suspect.


April 22, 2015

Happy Lenins Birthday!

18 spectacularly wrong apocalyptic predictions made around the time of the first Earth Day in 1970, expect more this year

On the 30th anniversary of the first Earth Day in 1970, Ronald Bailey wrote an excellent article in the May 2000 edition of Reason Magazine titled “Earth Day, Then and Now.” In that article, Bailey noted that around the time of the first Earth Day, and in the years following, there was a “torrent of apocalyptic predictions” and many of those predictions were featured in his Reason article.  Well, now that more than 40 years have passed, how accurate were those predictions around the time of the first Earth Day? Wrong, spectacularly wrong, and here are 18 examples:
1. Harvard biologist George Wald estimated that “civilization will end within 15 or 30 years unless immediate action is taken against problems facing mankind.”
2. “We are in an environmental crisis which threatens the survival of this nation, and of the world as a suitable place of human habitation,” wrote Washington University biologist Barry Commoner in the Earth Day issue of the scholarly journal Environment.
3. The day after the first Earth Day, the New York Times editorial page warned, “Man must stop pollution and conserve his resources, not merely to enhance existence but to save the race from intolerable deterioration and possible extinction.”
4. “Population will inevitably and completely outstrip whatever small increases in food supplies we make,” Paul Ehrlich confidently declared in the April 1970 Mademoiselle. “The death rate will increase until at least 100-200 million people per year will be starving to death during the next ten years.”
5. “Most of the people who are going to die in the greatest cataclysm in the history of man have already been born,” wrote Paul Ehrlich in a 1969 essay titled “Eco-Catastrophe! “By…[1975] some experts feel that food shortages will have escalated the present level of world hunger and starvation into famines of unbelievable proportions. Other experts, more optimistic, think the ultimate food-population collision will not occur until the decade of the 1980s.”
6. Ehrlich sketched out his most alarmist scenario for the 1970 Earth Day issue of The Progressive, assuring readers that between 1980 and 1989, some 4 billion people, including 65 million Americans, would perish in the “Great Die-Off.”
7. “It is already too late to avoid mass starvation,” declared Denis Hayes, the chief organizer for Earth Day, in the Spring 1970 issue of The Living Wilderness.
8. Peter Gunter, a North Texas State University professor, wrote in 1970, “Demographers agree almost unanimously on the following grim timetable: by 1975 widespread famines will begin in India; these will spread by 1990 to include all of India, Pakistan, China and the Near East, Africa. By the year 2000, or conceivably sooner, South and Central America will exist under famine conditions….By the year 2000, thirty years from now, the entire world, with the exception of Western Europe, North America, and Australia, will be in famine.”
9. In January 1970, Life reported, “Scientists have solid experimental and theoretical evidence to support…the following predictions: In a decade, urban dwellers will have to wear gas masks to survive air pollution…by 1985 air pollution will have reduced the amount of sunlight reaching earth by one half….”
10. Ecologist Kenneth Watt told Time that, “At the present rate of nitrogen buildup, it’s only a matter of time before light will be filtered out of the atmosphere and none of our land will be usable.”
11. Barry Commoner predicted that decaying organic pollutants would use up all of the oxygen in America’s rivers, causing freshwater fish to suffocate.
12. Paul Ehrlich chimed in, predicting in his 1970 that “air pollution…is certainly going to take hundreds of thousands of lives in the next few years alone.” Ehrlich sketched a scenario in which 200,000 Americans would die in 1973 during “smog disasters” in New York and Los Angeles.
13. Paul Ehrlich warned in the May 1970 issue of Audubon that DDT and other chlorinated hydrocarbons “may have substantially reduced the life expectancy of people born since 1945.” Ehrlich warned that Americans born since 1946…now had a life expectancy of only 49 years, and he predicted that if current patterns continued this expectancy would reach 42 years by 1980, when it might level out.
14. Ecologist Kenneth Watt declared, “By the year 2000, if present trends continue, we will be using up crude oil at such a rate…that there won’t be any more crude oil. You’ll drive up to the pump and say, `Fill ‘er up, buddy,’ and he’ll say, `I am very sorry, there isn’t any.'”
15. Harrison Brown, a scientist at the National Academy of Sciences, published a chart in Scientific American that looked at metal reserves and estimated the humanity would totally run out of copper shortly after 2000. Lead, zinc, tin, gold, and silver would be gone before 1990.
16. Sen. Gaylord Nelson wrote in Look that, “Dr. S. Dillon Ripley, secretary of the Smithsonian Institute, believes that in 25 years, somewhere between 75 and 80 percent of all the species of living animals will be extinct.”
17. In 1975, Paul Ehrlich predicted that “since more than nine-tenths of the original tropical rainforests will be removed in most areas within the next 30 years or so, it is expected that half of the organisms in these areas will vanish with it.”
18. Kenneth Watt warned about a pending Ice Age in a speech. “The world has been chilling sharply for about twenty years,” he declared. “If present trends continue, the world will be about four degrees colder for the global mean temperature in 1990, but eleven degrees colder in the year 2000. This is about twice what it would take to put us into an ice age.”
MP: Let’s keep those spectacularly wrong predictions from the first Earth Day 1970 in mind when we’re bombarded tomorrow with media hype, and claims like this from the official Earth Day website:
The fight against climate change is at an impasse and life on Earth hangs in the balance. Help us save polar bears and other wildlife as their habitats disappear and their food sources become scarce. Like the polar bear, human life is under threat, too. Storms are becoming stronger, droughts are becoming more severe, and rising sea levels encroach on our cities. We need an active informed public to stand tall, stop and reverse climate change and protect our children’s future!
Finally, think about this question, posed by Ronald Bailey: What will Earth look like when Earth Day 60 rolls around in 2030? Bailey predicts a much cleaner, and much richer future world, with less hunger and malnutrition, less poverty, and longer life expectancy, and with lower mineral and metal prices. But he makes one final prediction about Earth Day in 2030: “There will be a disproportionately influential group of doomsters predicting that the future–and the present–never looked so bleak.” In other words, the hysteria and apocalyptic predictions will continue, promoted by the “environmental grievance hustlers.”